Animal Use

Animals, just like people, have a range of emotions, and therefore the Bach Flower Remedies may well be of help in dealing with such issues.  Animals can feel lonely, fearful, angry, jealous, grief, and both mental and physical exhaustion etc to name but a few emotions.  Therefore, stress of any kind could well affect their behaviour.

Animals, just like people, have a range of emotions, and therefore the Bach Flower Remedies may well be of help in dealing with such issues.  Animals can feel lonely, fearful, angry, jealous, grief, and both mental and physical exhaustion etc to name but a few emotions.  Therefore, stress of any kind could well affect their behaviour.

As mentioned previously if you are thinking of using the remedies on your own animals or contacting a registered practitioner do inform your vet initially, to ensure that your animal is not suffering from any physical problem which might be causing behavioural issues.

Remedies can be given between 2-4 times a day and how to administer them depends on the animal concerned, as each one is an individual.  Generally speaking for dogs remedies can be added to their food.

Cats tend not to like remedies on food, so put a few drops on their paws which they can lick and absorb when they groom themselves.

With horses, you may find it easier to put the drops in their drinking water, remembering to change this several times a day.  Alternatively, drops can be put into an apple cut into quarters (pips scooped out) and then fed directly to the horse.

As the Bach Flower Remedies work on the emotional level owners sometimes see a positive change in behaviour which may have an effect on  the physical.  Animals are sentient beings and as explained earlier can feel grief, anger, loneliness, jealousy, and fear etc as well as general stress and tension. Some dogs and cats dislike going into kennels or catteries whilst their owners are away, and, therefore, can feel insecure or at times abandoned. Early experiences can also have a great impact on how the animal will be as it gets older.

Many dogs do not like being on their own all day and show signs of separation anxiety as well as other problematic behaviours. I spend time talking to owners to build up a complete picture of the animal concerned.  A client may have owned one particular breed for a great many years, yet each animal is an individual and its responses to situations etc can differ widely.

Over the years I have worked with many different animals, including birds, sheep and goats. Every animal is seen as an individual. It is worth noting  too that sometimes the constraints we place on them  causes them stress, especially if they are in a situation they find intolerable.

It is important that the remedies are used until some change in outlook is seen, and it may well be that after an initial period remedies have to be changed in the light of underlying problems.  A dog that barks at another dog or lunges at it whilst being walked may be seen as showing aggression, whereas a lot of aggressive-type behaviour is actually fear based, some of which may be learned behaviour.

Treatment and Support

After the initial telephone conversation during which as much information as possible on your animal is noted, a consultation date is arranged,  usually at the client’s house, if this is within a reasonable travelling distance.  In the case of larger animals, eg horses it is essential that they are seen in situ.

A consultation normally lasts between 45-60 minutes at the end of which a treatment bottle is made up and the client informed how to administer the drops.  The client is also asked to make telephone contact after the first week to update the practitioner on any changes etc that may have taken place.  Support, if necessary, is ongoing.